Cannes

LAV DIAZ: “CINEMA IS ZEN”

By Monica Delgado

Lav Diaz’s The halt (Ang Hupa) was presented in the latest edition of the Directors’ Fortnight in Cannes. Because of a previous commitment with Film School San Antonio de los Baños, in Cuba, Lav couldn’t assist to the usual Q&A after the screenings, and we were disappointed not to have, first hand, his impressions about this new almost five-hour film.

CANNES 2019: A BRIEF BALANCE

By Mónica Delgado

Thirty pieces, over forty films seen in eleven days, a film almost 5-hours long, three masterpieces, at least a couple of rubbish films from “renowned” filmmakers, an inmmense disappointment, two great documentaries, a lot of zombies, Robbert Pattinson, the first black woman to get recognition, a beautiful feminist allegation set in the late 19th century, the return of Quentin Tarantino, the first Peruvian filmmaker in the Quinzaine des Realizateurs, a poor participation of Latin American cinema in the official sections, Serra and Dumont, two movies in film, Carpenter and Argento, or Stallone with his Rambo. This edition of Cannes 2019 has been without a doubt, memorable.

CANNES 2019: BLOW IT TO BITS BY LECH KOWALSKI

By Mónica Delgado

The most combative film in all this edition of Cannes came in hand with the emblematic Lech Kowalski. If it’s indeed true that in this eleven-day journey, certain demonstrations of a militant and political cinema had indeed happened with two Latin American filmmakers (Patricio Guzmán and Juan Solanas), in Blow it to bits (On va tout péter) we finally got some room for the workers’ voice.

CANNES 2019: SICK, SICK, SICK BY ALICE FURTADO

By Mónica Delgado

In this edition of Cannes, we joked several times among critics and journalists about the zombie theme that unintentionally, had overtaken the screens this year: the inauguration of the Jarmusch film, the Bonello film in La Quinzaine des Realizateurs, or the drowsy beings of the Mati Diop’s film. Alice Furtado’s Sick, Sick, Sick (Sem Sue Sengue) also follows this path.

CANNES 2019: UN BREVE BALANCE

Por Mónica Delgado

A diferencia de años anteriores, podemos afirmar que nos hemos ido de Cannes con la Palma de Oro que queríamos. Si bien, La Gomera de Cristi Poroumbiu era nuestra favorita, el reconocimiento unánime del jurado a Parasite de Bong Joon-ho confirmó una edición que tuvo un mejor nivel, a pesar de algunos tropiezos encarnados en los trabajos de Xavier Dolan o Arnaud Desplechin.

CANNES 2019: PARASITE DE BONG JOON-HO

Por Mónica Delgado

Por primera vez en la historia de Cannes, un film surcoreano se lleva la Palma de Oro. El mérito es indiscutible, por tratarse de una de las mejores películas en la carrera de Bong Joon-ho (quizás solo comparable a la proeza de Memories of Murder en 2003) y por ser una comedia agridulce que lo marca como un cineasta que se sigue entregando con creatividad a cualquier género (ya sea drama, thriller, monster movie o ciencia ficción) que se le apetezca.

CANNES 2019: LITTLE JOE BY JESSICA HAUSNER

By Mónica Delgado

With over six features under her sleeve, Austrian filmmaker Jessica Hausner returns to Cannes yet again, but this time with a feature film in the official competition: an exercise in science fiction but with quotas of family drama, stylized and plentiful in carefully composed tonalities and different color pallets. It’s a science fiction film with touches of horror, elegant and refined.

CANNES 2019: LAND OF ASHES AND FOR THE MONEY

By Mónica Delgado

Land of Ashes is the first feature in the history of Costa Rica participating in Cannes. Directed by Sofía Quirós, it’s an intimate film with oneiric touches, about an adolescent without parents who lives with her grandparents in a jungle zone. Presented in Critics’ Week, Land of Ashes can’t escape some classic elements of Latin American exotization; however, it does possess a wonderful actress: Smashleen Gutiérrez.

CANNES 2019: BLOW IT TO BITS DE LECH KOWALSKI

Por Mónica Delgado

La película más combativa de toda esta edición de Cannes vino de la mano del emblemático Lech Kowalski. Si bien durante esta jornada de once días hubo demostraciones de un cine militante y político en los trabajos de Patricio Guzmán o en el de Juan Solanas (como apoyo a la campaña por el derecho al aborto en Argentina), dos latinoamericanos, con Blow it to bits (On va tout péter) se dio espacio para la voz obrera.

CANNES 2019: THE LIGHTHOUSE BY ROBERT EGGERS

By Mónica Delgado

What a better figure that the one of an imposing lighthouse to inquire about masculine fears? If in The Witch (2015), American filmmaker Robert Eggers explores the fears of trickeries and religious precepts in a community of New England in the seventeenth century, in The Lighthouse (2019), he stops in two solitary characters trapped in an island at the end of the nineteenth century, who survive among hallucinations, the effects of alcohol and the majesty of a lighthouse (the father, the libido or the symbolic power) which rules it all.

CANNES 2019: ONCE UPON A TIME…IN HOLLYWOOD BY QUENTIN TARANTINO

By Mónica Delgado

Tarantino’s request of “no spoilers” for his film, made for the general audience, critics and journalists around the world, has little to do with revealing plots, or some turn of the screw that could’ve ruined the tension of the spectator. Quentin’s request has to do with another aspect of the film, which lies in its core itself. When Once upon a time… in Hollywood ends, one has the impression of having assisted to an exemplary act which shows the capacity of cinema of transforming reality, of proposing an exit and creating an evasion, maybe even accomplishing a dream. What Tarantino did in this film is closer to the highest degree of sublimation of cinema. The filmmaker of Reservoir dogs and Death proof has materialized that which cinema can achieve to mean for several people: a way of salvation.