Film Festival Reports

Our coverage on the latest film fests.

BAFICI 2017: DAYS FIVE AND SIX

By Desistfilm

Days five and six and the festival is near its ending. Among some amazing retrospectives and restored versions of old masterpieces, here are some reviews of the films we’ve seen these days

BAFICI 2017 COVERAGE: DAYS THREE AND FOUR

by Desistfilm

Days two and three in Buenos Aires were pretty intense. We’re still a little hangover from watching so many films, but here are the reviews for days three and four.

BAFICI 2017 COVERAGE: DAY ONE AND TWO

By Desistfilm

The new edition of Buenos Aires Film Festival (BAFICI), one of the most important film festivals around the world, started a couple of days ago, and Desistfilm landed in Argentina to cover this magnificent celebration of cinema.

DIAGONALE 2017: FESTIVAL OF AUSTRIAN FILM

By Claudia Siefen

At the Diagonale, as in any other venue, I encountered these two camps again: those who consider themselves artists with the clear expectation to be subsidized for it and make films, and those who treat the business as an everyday job. But despite of that I managed to find few works that I’m really happy with, which made their way to cinemas. And galleries.

COURTISANE 2017: HOW DOES IT MEAN? – JACQUES RANCIÈRE AND DISSENT!

by Tara Judah

Courtisane, as a festival, far more than most, creates its fiction with all the skill and care that curation ought. The films are selected – not for their timeliness or premiere status, but for their ability to engage and provoke curiosity – and are shown in the hope of sharing something as simple yet powerful as “notes on cinema”. The notes, with all the hallmarks of great fiction, are quite simply an invitation to inquiry.

CINÉMA DU RÉEL 2017: MARTIRIO BY VINCENT CARELLI, ERNESTO DE CARVALHO AND TATIANA ALMEIDA

By Aldo Padilla

The shot opening the film is a recording where Vincent Carrelli struggles to understand the hybrid dialect used by the indigenous people, which is an excellent resource understood as a way of starting a path. Almost at the end, the same shot is repeated, but now with a proper translation, which indicates that through the recording process an evolution has been reached, a connection with the indigenous people which doesn’t feel alien anymore.

CINÉMA DU RÉEL 2017: LUZ OBSCURA BY SUSANA DE SOUSA DIAS

By Ivonne Sheen

Susana de Sousa’s Luz Obscura (Obscure Light) is a sensitive essay about memory and time through the juxtaposition of images (archive photos) from the political dissidents and audios of their children’s memories. These testimonies of former Portuguese communists’ children that were imprisoned by the PIDE (Portuguese police) during the years of the Antonio de Oliveira’s regime are now voices of aching adults whose memories we listen to.

CINÉMA DU REÉL 2017: EJERCICIOS DE MEMORIA BY PAZ ENCINA

By Morella Moret
Ejercicios de Memoria tells us from a particular case, the story of many families during the Paraguayan dictatorship: the thousands of missing people that haven’t yet been found and the many death ones without a name. Finally, it doesn’t only narrate the story of a country but of many similar regimes whose memories have been forgotten.

CINÉMA DU RÉEL 2017: THE FILMS OF ING K

By Nicole Brenez
That’s how art connects directly with the violence of reality and finds itself reconfigured in it, as it is accredited in the work of Ing K, completely consecrated to the political, social, religious, economic and ecological problems of her country, Thailand, or, as she calls it “Siam”, according to its anti-fascist name.

CINÉMA DU RÉEL 2017: LES ÎLES RÉSONNANTES (RESONANT ISLANDS) BY JURUNA MALLON

By Ivonne Sheen
Juruna Mallon’s Les Îles Résonnantes (Resonant Islands) approaches Eliane Radigue and her aesthetics with a subtle audiovisual composition that mixes her sound sculptures with visual explorations of herself, her work, and evocations from her music. The film stands far away from any precise biographical portrayal to immerse us in her intimate and spiritual approach to sound, music and life.

CINÉMA DU RÉEL 2017: AUSTERLITZ BY SERGEI LOZNITSA

By Aldo Padilla
Austerlitz has been analyzed as a portrayal of horror as a commodity and the relation of man with its history, which is something that Loznitsa explores in his filmography, but it’s also pertinent to point to the depersonalization of the people moving in front of the camera, reducing it all to masses with an undefined face, which seem to condemn they all from the beginning. It’s possible that everything said until now can be reduced to a simple question: Does Loznitsa and the spectators feel morally superior to the people being filmed?