Film Festival Reports

Our coverage on the latest film fests.

CANNES 2017: THE NOTHING FACTORY BY PEDRO PINHO

By Mónica Delgado

A fábrica de Nada, presented in the Quinzaine de Realisateurs, speaks about something no other Cannes film has mentioned: the reality of a Europe that screams for a life jacket, but not because of migration or racism issues, xenophobia or bourgeois indifference; where the only exit is renouncing the world we live in, coped by the result of this economical system: nothingness.

CANNES 2017: THE BEGUILED BY SOFIA COPPOLA

By Mónica Delgado

The greatest merit of The Beguiled lies in how Coppola constructs the relationships between women, through silences or simple and suggestive dialogues that avoid evilness, and bets for an atmosphere of power plays, where the photography unveils this darkness that the actions repress or hide.

CANNES 2017: THE DAY AFTER BY HONG SANG-SOO

By Mónica Delgado

In The Day After, one finds some subtle transformations on the narrative strategies of Hong Sang-soo had patented throughout his filmography: variations on a same theme or occurrence, where the narrator has the ability to return to a previous scene to revisit it, thus originating a double lecture of what could have been.

CANNES 2017: LA FAMILIA BY GUSTAVO RONDÓN CÓRDOVA

By Mónica Delgado

It’s impossible not to see La Familia from the political, social and economic crisis that Venezuela is suffering in the last years. However, Gustavo Rondón Cordova isn’t looking to make a social diagnosis or any kind of critique to the present regime in his first feature film.

CANNES 2017: THE FLORIDA PROJECT BY SEAN BAKER

By Mónica Delgado

Sean Baker’s The Florida Project is a film about the construction of a Paradise, of a bubble, of an arcade of roses for children among an obscure America, the America of unemployment, poverty and crisis.

CANNES 2017: HAPPY END BY MICHAEL HANEKE

By Mónica Delgado

Beyond this social scan that Haneke deems as absolutely necessary, such in films like Funny Games of Caché, his film dwells better in the passages that talk about a unhealthy family side, incarnated in the figure of the child, a kind of proto-psychopath, marked with Haneke’s undertones all over

CANNES 2017: JEANNETTE L’ENFANCE DE JEANNE D’ARC BY BRUNO DUMONT

By Mónica Delgado

Divided en three parts, Jeannette, L’Enfance de Jeanne d’Arc is an absolutely unusual musical, but at the same time it is a very “Dumontian” film. His style is clearly recognizable in the actors’ direction, in its “medieval” physiognomies, in the austerity of his mise in scene and also in the clear familiarity with the absurdist comedy he’s been working in in the last years. A free and creative work, that presents an iconoclastic and renewed Dumont.

CANNES 2017: THE SQUARE BY RUBEN ÖSTLUND

By Mónica Delgado

The Square poses a special relationship between art and men. Is art any good nowadays to transform society or people? -the dream of the old vanguards.

CANNES 2017: L’AMANT D’UN JOUR BY PHILIPPE GARREL

By Mónica Delgado

Garrel returns to his previous ghosts: variations on the topic of love, its transformation, but never its denial. Through a porous black and white, the French filmmaker applies all of his measured sentimentality and proposes an ambivalent character to remember, the one played by Louise Chevillote, showed in a kind of Nouvelle Vague-splendor.

CANNES 2017: VISAGE VILLAGES, BY JR AND AGNÉS VARDA

By Mónica Delgado

It’s impossible to remain unmoved by such an affectionate film, not only because of the sympathy that Varda transmits, but because it’s a film that it’s constantly speaking and showing characters who share experiences, and are surprised by the result of the collaboration between the two filmmakers.