Jeonju

JEONJU 2012: EX PRESS DE JET LEYCO

Por Mónica Delgado

Jet Leyco, de 24 años, debuta en el largometraje con Ex Press, una suerte de documental con estallidos dramáticos a modo de ensoñaciones y nostalgias sobre la vida y muerte de un tren, casi extraviado o vuelto fantasma en los arrabales de un pueblo en las afueras de Manila, que ha resistido a la pobreza y al olvido del gobierno.

JEONJU 2012: EARLY SPRINGS, GYEONGJU BY PARK IN-KYONG

By Blue Un-Sok Kim

The city of Gyeongju holds a special place in the collective psyche of the Korean people. As the former capital of the ancient Korean kingdom of Silla, the city is referred to as a «museum without walls».

JEONJU 2012: TREE OR WOOD BY LEE EUN-JOO

By Catherine Jessica Beed

Lee Eun-Joo‘s short is a curious attempt to arrange a dichotomy between the transient beauty of nature in all its abstractions and the artificiality of manufactured objects. As a brief dialogue between the lateral abstract images of wood and foliage and the composition of sound, close-up controlled shots of trees in various states move at a rapid pace against the rise and fall in the musical structure.

JEONJU 2012: MORNING GLORY BY WHANG CHEOL MEAN

By John A. Riley

Hyun-Jun is an actor, specialising in musical theatre. He is given an opportunity to study acting in America, but before venturing abroad, he returns to the small village where he grew up. Once there he re-kindles his acquaintance with his beautiful cousin So-yeon, acquaintance quickly turning to Romantic desire

JEONJU 2012: INTERFERE BY JEON JUNE-HYUCK

By Narda Liotine

To say cinema is a matter of movement tout court is something I personally don’t agree with: To experience film format as a big canvas should imply that one is able to explore every single fragment of a reel and contemplate their unique beauty.

JEONJU 2012: WITHOUT FATHER BY KIM EUNG-SU

By John A. Riley

Watching an East Asian film, the Anglophone, Euro-Americo-centric viewer comes face to face with an at-first pressing dilemma: whether to incorporate everything one sees into familiar, Western paradigms or whether to defer to the infinite mysteries of the Orient