Q&A

Interviews and conversations with filmmakers worldwide.

Q & A: JAN SOLDAT

By Pamela Cohn

Jan Soldat’s documentary work is the purest storytelling I’ve seen in cinema. What might blur or mar this purity, at first blush, is the subject matter he tends to choose. But like many filmmakers I’ve spoken to, he uses his craft in order to search, to seek and to satisfy his own unending curiosities about his fellow human beings.

Q & A: VERONIKA LIŠKOVÁ

By Pamela Cohn

Czech filmmaker Veronika Lišková followed Daniel for one year as he introduces his family, friends, and the society in which he lives into his world living as a pedophile. An exceedingly empathetic and human-scale story, Daniel’s World captures both the public and private moments of his confessions.

Q & A: PETER VON BAGH (1943-2014)

By Julian Ross

Just two years ago, Peter von Bagh (1943-2014) was the subject of a Signals retrospective programme at the 41st International Film Festival Rotterdam. I’m ashamed to say I had never heard of him before. But the idea of a reverse Pickpocket in the form of Pockpicket eli katkelmia helsinkilaisen porvarisnuoren elämästä (Pockpicket – Recollections of a Helsinki Bourgeois Youth, 1968) intrigued me and I headed to the cinema.

Q & A: NATHAN SILVER

By Mónica Delgado & José Sarmiento Hinojosa

Let’s get things straight: Nathan Silver makes cinema in a “family key”, literally. He acts with his parents, his friends become lead characters for his films and his ex-girlfriend isn’t afraid to be directed by him. Overall, he impregnates this familiar game of being and becoming with the humor and complicity of his films. Desistfilm talked with this exceptional New York filmmaker who promises to keep surprising us with an unexplored face of irony.

Q & A: CS LEIGH

CS Leigh and Guillaume Depardieu in the set of Process (2004) By José Sarmiento Hinojosa The enigma of CS Leigh, one of the most obscure filmmakers of the last twenty years, seems to be a legend constructed through the indifference of Leigh himself and a number of different people setting their energies on creating the myth he […]

Q & A: AMRIT GANGAR. PRAYOGA, POSSIBILITIES OF CINEMA, CONVERSATIONS AND CONTEMPLATIONS

By Ranjana Raghunathan

Amrit Gangar is a Mumbai-based independent writer, film theorist, curator and historian. He has worked in the field of cinema in various capacities for over three decades. He has written widely on Indian cinema, and co-founded the Mumbai-based film society Screen Unit, which he ran for over twenty years. During those years, he curated a number of programmes and published books.

Q & A: KEN JACOBS

By David Phelps

A symptomatic story of many others internationally at the time, and yet taking to the streets in the most practical way—arming the populace with cameras, audio recorders, and basic editing proficiency—seems a particularly Ken Jacobs-like idea of home movie activism.

PUNK INTERVENTION: A CONVERSATION WITH F.J. OSSANG

Interview by Michèle Collery, Mina Blumenfield and Mónica Delgado

Only rockers love poetry and literature – sometimes you wonder! We speak about rock and roll, I told him that I want to make a film of the classic punk age, haunted by Arthur Craven, the boxer, who traumatized Breton, who also was Oscar Wilde’s nephews . And it all melt between The Clash, the Sex Pistols, Vince Taylor, Arthur Cravan: it all enchanted Strummer. We had drank champagne in a pizzeria and I don’t know what and then he said “Now, we go to the pub.” So here we are, ordered in speed, the producer drank vodka on the rocks, I was gin and tonic, 3 or 4, I don’t remember what he took -we had to ordered fast because they didn’t served after that – thus, we each had our 3 or 4 glasses, we play darts and he says “Ok Ossang, I’ll do your movie!”

Q&A: DAVIDE MANULI

By Mónica Delgado

Davide Manuli (Milan, 1967) might be best known for his last escapade into Rotterdam with “La Leggenda di Gaspar Hauser”, a very particular retake on the classic myth carried to the big screen by Werner Herzog, but this Italian filmmaker has been around since the late eighties’ struggling to find (and finally succeeding) a new narrative in cinema, which responds to the absurd and the warm embrace of dance music as means of communication.

Q & A: ALEX COX

By John A. Riley and Mónica Delgado

“I’d like to shoot a different ending for Sid and Nancy, too. But I’m less fond of that film. Straight to Hell was always one of my favourites and revisiting it, playing around with it, making it more bloodthirsty and giving it a different colour treatment and more skeletons and reinserting the deleted scenes… it was a real treat”.

Q & A: CHRISTELLE LHEUREUX

By José Sarmiento Hinojosa

“Yes, the white disease is eating us everyday. Time is changing everything, everything disappears and fades and it’s ok, that’s life… The question is more to be aware of what we are loosing and what we are getting new. Our spirituality is changing super quickly, even in just one generation. I think cinema has a lot to do with that question of time, because this medium deals mostly with memory”.

Q&A: JOANA PREISS

By José Sarmiento Hinojosa

“Sibérie is one of the main characters of the film for all the reasons you describe. It’s like a mirror with of the raw and honest meditation of love, it’s a perfect décor for this “triste geographie des sentiments”, and the train helped us to have this kind of lonely feelings, increased by our “huis clos” inside the Trans cabin, in front of the big window, on the exterior as a big travelling shot with the immensity rugged inhabited landscapes”.