Cairo Film Festival

CAIRO FILM FESTIVAL 2016: POLAR BOY BY ANUN AUN

By Tara Judah

Using disappointingly one-dimensional stereotypes to tell a male coming-of-age story is Anu Aun’s Estonian entry into the Official Competition at the 38th Cairo International Film Festival, Polaarpoiss (Polar Boy).

CAIRO FILM FESTIVAL 2016: AFTER THE STORM BY HIROKASU KORE-EDA

By Tara Judah

After the Storm is a beautiful film that has brought tearstains from my soul to the surface. And, as the fictional typhoon moved on, and the credits rolled, I smiled. After the film, I know my tears will dry, outside the auditorium, in the cool breeze of the very real world.

CAIRO FILM FESTIVAL 2016: ANNA’S LIFE BY NINO BASILIA

By Tara Judah

It costs too much, everything. Anna answers her apartment door to a man, his hand trembling, as he clutches a cup and a religious image. He asks for money; his child is sick and needs medicine. Anna is on the phone; she is agitated, distracted and, after rummaging in the fridge, brings him meat and fresh bread. The man is disappointed, “I’d prefer money,” he tells her. “I’d also prefer money, but I don’t have it,” she spits back, and closes the door.

CAIRO FILM FESTIVAL 2016: TJUVHEDER BY PETER GRÖNLUND

By Tara Judah

It may be a stretch to call them ‘popular’, but Sans toit ni loi (Vagabond, Agnès Varda, 1985), Wendy and Lucy (Kelly Reichardt, 2008) and Cathy Come Home (Ken Loach, 1964) are engaging and well revered films about homeless women. Tjuvheder (Drifters), which has screened in Sweden and Norway and at a handful of international film festivals, is a Swedish film about two homeless women who are stuck in a cycle of poverty and substance abuse.