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Q&A

Cine latinoamericano

UN CAMINO HACIA LA VIDA. UNA CONVERSACIÓN CON LAURA MORA SOBRE ‘LOS REYES DEL MUNDO’

Por Alejandra Meneses

Después de Matar a Jesús, la directora colombiana Laura Mora estrenó su segundo largometraje Los reyes del mundo, película ganadora de la Concha de Oro a ‘Mejor película’ en el Festival Internacional de Cine de San Sebastián. En esta conversación, la realizadora comparte un poco del viaje entre la violencia y la poesía de Los reyes del mundo, cinco jóvenes que van a reclamar una tierra en el Bajo Cauca colombiano.

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Eng

BETTE GORDON: THE ARTIST THAT PAINTS IMAGES WITH LIGHT

By Víctor Paz Morandeira

American filmmaker Bette Gordon was in the spotlight in 2020 due to the recent restoration of her cult film Variety (1983), which found an obstacle in its way to theaters in the COVID-19 pandemic. Fortunately Play-Doc International Film Festival (Tui, Spain) gave us the opportunity this year to discover this gem on the big screen. The story depicts the life of a young woman who works in a porn theater in Manhattan selling tickets. Not only does the film subvert the traditional idea of female representation, but it also shows hidden unconventional human landscapes of New York by having the protagonist follow a mysterious client around the city. Gordon inverts the Madeleine-like stereotype of the beauty that exists only for the pleasure of the male gaze in a very playful way, delivering a feminist film – profoundly influenced by Laura Mulvey’s essays put into practice – that does not feel militant at all.

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Eng

KIM KNOWLES: “PHOTOCHEMICAL FILM CAN BRING ABOUT A NEW KIND OF ETHICAL OR ENVIRONMENTAL CONSCIOUSNESS”

By Tomáš Hudák

Despite film becoming a predominantly digital medium in the 21st century, photochemical film has not disappeared completely. There is still a vibrant scene of experimental cinema around it that doesn’t value analogue film for its past glories but focuses on how it can speak to our present and help us reflect on contemporary issues like climate change. Newly established artist-run labs and collectives are therefore not only an expression of artistic ambitions or aesthetical priorities, but can be understood as part of wider social and political movements.

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Al Este de Lima

JESSICA HAUSNER: HUMOR IS A WAY TO COPE WITH THE UNCERTAINTY OF LIFE

By José Sarmiento and Mónica Delgado

As part of the recent edition of the Al Este de Lima festival, the Austrian filmmaker Jessica Hausner gave a masterclass, where she delved into her work before a Peruvian audience. In this framework, we were able to talk with her about her motivations, her staging and her female leading characters.

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Q&A

COURTNEY STEPHENS: “MY GOAL IS TO GET SOMEWHERE DIFFERENT THAN WHERE I STARTED”

By José Sarmiento Hinojosa

Decoding Courtney Stephens’ work is an apt term for the ideological (the ideological as the immanent referent of the platonic realm) transit involved in being presented with her films. Indeed, being a spectator of films like Mixed Signals or Ida Western Exile, implies being open to the multiple poetic relations between signifier and signified, a process that achieves a particular transcendence through contemplation and montage.

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desistfilm

JANIE GEISER: “I LIKE TO BE INVOLVED IN WORK THAT ALLOWS MY CURIOSITY TO GET IN PLAY”

By José Sarmiento Hinojosa

I would like to recover some words with a previous exchange with Louisiana-born artist Janie Geiser, which aptly reflect on how I still feel about the work of this wonderful American experimental filmmaker, author of masterpieces of collage cinema such as The Red Book (1994), Ghost Algebra (2010), Valeria Street (2018), Reverse Shadow (2019), among many others. Janie also works in installation and performance with expanded cinema and puppets, and co-created Automata, an experimental film and puppet theater in Los Angeles.

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Q&A

JOHN GIANVITO: “MY SPIRITUAL AND POLITICAL BELIEFS ARE ROOTED IN THE NATURAL WORLD”

By José Sarmiento Hinojosa & Mónica Delgado

Over the course of four years, the perspectives over the thinking process of filmmaker extraordinaire John Gianvito have remained solid, but it’s fundamental to read his ideas through the passage of time, contemplating the current moment of the first part of this interview, in 2017 (amidst the Trump administration), and the second one, in 2021 (in its aftermath), on the making of his latest documentary Her Socialist Smile (2020), about the activist, socialist side of Helen Keller. Our 2017 interview was meant to be included in a cinema and politics dossier that never saw the light of day, but nonetheless, perfectly articulated Gianvito’s political ideas and filmmaking ethos as a catalyst of the problems he saw of post-colonialism issues, the exercise of capitalism and American imperialism and its aftermath in its own history and the history of countries as the Philippines.

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Eng

ANTONI PINENT: “CELLULOID PRODUCES PHYSIOLOGICAL SENSATIONS THAT DIGITAL DOES NOT CONTAIN”

By José Sarmiento and Mónica Delgado

Almost at the end of last year, Spanish filmmaker, curator and teacher, currently based in Los Angeles, Antoni Pinent premiered his new work “i STiLL BELiEVE iN CELLULOiD” [aka ‘film beyond film’] or iSBiC (2020), a series of short films (or capsules as he calls them) as part of a multimedia project that reflects on the practice and validity of experimental cinema, art and celluloid as a subject.

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Q&A

SANDRA LUZ LÓPEZ BARROSO: “MY FILM HAS A COMPASS: THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING ABLE TO SAY GOODBYE”

By Mónica Delgado

Since her final project, Son de Artesa (2006-2007), Mexican filmmaker Sandra Luz López Barroso showed her interest in reflecting personal and social dynamics within the Afro-descendant communities in her country. A few days ago, she won the award for best film in the Now Mexico section at Ficunam Film Festival competition, with her first feature film El Compromiso de las sombras, along with Los fundadores, by Diego Hernández. In this first film, she returns to the registry of a territory that she has known for more than fifteen years, but through Lizbeth, a trans woman who directs the funeral rituals of several communities in the Costa Chica, an area of Afro-Mexican towns between the states of Guerrero and Oaxaca.

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