Esther Garrel

Esther Garrel

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desistfilm

PANORAMA: THIRST STREET BY NATHAN SILVER

By José Sarmiento-Hinojosa

If maybe more contrived and less risky than his previous affairs, Thirst Street is Silver appropriate salute to amour-fou. Burdge is never out of control, or portrayed like a neurotic women; her attitude of naivete and obliviousness is exemplary awkward but also shows an unrestricted frailty. Silver never uses one-dimensional characters and here is no exception: even Bonnard, at his most deceptive, is just an aimless man, discouraged and adrift. The construction of this narrative, along the use of a particular atmospheric use of photography and camera, elevates this tragic comedy to a realm of the almost oneiric, something like a fever dream, or a wild fantasy.

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Cannes

CANNES 2017: L’AMANT D’UN JOUR BY PHILIPPE GARREL

By Mónica Delgado

Garrel returns to his previous ghosts: variations on the topic of love, its transformation, but never its denial. Through a porous black and white, the French filmmaker applies all of his measured sentimentality and proposes an ambivalent character to remember, the one played by Louise Chevillote, showed in a kind of Nouvelle Vague-splendor.

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