Film Festival Reports

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Film Festival Reports

JEONJU 2012: TREE OR WOOD BY LEE EUN-JOO

By Catherine Jessica Beed

Lee Eun-Joo‘s short is a curious attempt to arrange a dichotomy between the transient beauty of nature in all its abstractions and the artificiality of manufactured objects. As a brief dialogue between the lateral abstract images of wood and foliage and the composition of sound, close-up controlled shots of trees in various states move at a rapid pace against the rise and fall in the musical structure.

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Film Festival Reports

JEONJU 2012: MORNING GLORY BY WHANG CHEOL MEAN

By John A. Riley

Hyun-Jun is an actor, specialising in musical theatre. He is given an opportunity to study acting in America, but before venturing abroad, he returns to the small village where he grew up. Once there he re-kindles his acquaintance with his beautiful cousin So-yeon, acquaintance quickly turning to Romantic desire

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Film Festival Reports

JEONJU 2012: INTERFERE BY JEON JUNE-HYUCK

By Narda Liotine

To say cinema is a matter of movement tout court is something I personally don’t agree with: To experience film format as a big canvas should imply that one is able to explore every single fragment of a reel and contemplate their unique beauty.

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Film Festival Reports

JEONJU 2012: WITHOUT FATHER BY KIM EUNG-SU

By John A. Riley

Watching an East Asian film, the Anglophone, Euro-Americo-centric viewer comes face to face with an at-first pressing dilemma: whether to incorporate everything one sees into familiar, Western paradigms or whether to defer to the infinite mysteries of the Orient

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BAFICI

BAFICI 2012: FOUR SHADES OF BROWN BY THOMAS ALFREDSON

By John A. Riley

Those who know Tomas Alfredson from his international successes Let the Right One In and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy are likely to consider him as a director at home with genre material, working with well-known tropes in a highly stylised but somehow unassuming way. His two well known films have a hard-edged indifference that is as exhilarating as it is chilling.

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BAFICI

BAFICI 2012: EIGHTY LETTER BY VÁCLAV KADRNKA

By Monica Delgado

Eighty Letters (Osmdesát Dopisú) by Václav Kadrnka is a film set in early eighties socialist Czech Republic under the ex USSR. The filmmaker has made it clear that this is an autobiographical film and it traces the memories of his adolescence, where his mother organized a future encounter with his father, who lived in London as a migrant.

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BAFICI

BAFICI 2012: HORS SATAN BY BRUNO DUMONT

By José Sarmiento Hinojosa

Somehow the religious and mystical overtones in Bruno Dumont‘s oeuvre have always been a trademark of his work, but in his latest films (especially Hadewijch and Hors Satan) they seem to slowly lose some of their subtlety and give way to a more evident although not less troubling mise-en-scene.

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