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Main Articles

PANORAMA: FOGO BY YULENE OLAIZOLA

By Wiwat Lertwiwatwongsa

A grey path leads to nothing but a tilted, half-collapsed house on waste ground. Everything is grey and cold. Police arrive, advising the residents to leave by the last ferry, but there’s no answer from within.

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Cine español

EL CANT DELS OCELLS DE ALBERT SERRA

By Claudia Siefen

Maybe you are familiar to the story of the Three Wise men Caspar, Melchior and Balthazar walking their long enfeebling path surching for the little child, supposed to be the savior and king of the world? Well, and maybe sometimes you asked yourself what has happen during that journey. What did they talk about, the three guys, what did they eat and where did they hang out. Have they ever been bored and have they ever thought …

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LOVE EATS THE SOUL: JAN PHILIPPE CARPIO’S HILO AND BALAY DAKU

per: Narda Liotine

Uno dei modi migliori per indagare le relazioni interpersonali è analizzare i pasti. Evitando quelli solitari, frugali e scomposti, preferiamo quelli affollati e i tête-à-tête. Il regista surrealista ceco Jan Svankmajer -dal seminale Dimensioni del dialogo (Možnosti dialogu, 1982) passando per il più recente Meat Love (1989) – ci insegna che consumare un pasto in compagnia può portare a scontri e contrasti. Nella sua riflessione artistica i tavoli da pranzo e le stoviglie sono creati per generare tanto l’armonia quanto il caos, ritenendo il primo come una possibile conseguenza del secondo.

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HORROR HOSPITAL BY ANTHONY BALCH

By John A. Riley

I’ve been captivated by cinema since I saw Superman split into his constituent good and evil parts to do battle in a junkyard. Growing up, I devoured anything I could, from blockbusters to Hammer Horror, to Welles and Hitchcock. As a university student, I was exposed to world cinema and the avant-garde too. But it wasn’t an academy-endorsed masterpiece that made the biggest impression on me; it was a chance encounter in the bargain bin of a cash and carry that resulted in me seeing a VHS of Horror Hospital.

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WHAT HAPPENED WAS…BY TOM NOONAM

By Jan Philippe V. Carpio

Perhaps in no other art form (and other art forms may disagree with this) do cinema’s practitioners constantly choose (and it is a seldom choice) to wage war with the tyranny of audience expectations. To perpetuate the tyranny of the regime, audiences usually possess five (of many) insidious weapons – immaturity, indifference, arrogance, laziness, distraction – which cinema’s practitioners engage with experience, involvement, humility, dedication, focus. These perpetual wars seem to stem from practitioners and audiences differing perceptions of cinema and its uses. And it is here, on one of the many battlefields of perceptions, where Tom Noonan’s What Happened Was … wages its delicate and covert war.

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THERE WILL BE BLOOD BY PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON

By Sarah Nichols

I won’t bore you with the milkshake. I was asked to write on a film that had changed my life, and while I came here planning to write about Vertigo, I realized that while it had changed my life—perhaps in ways that I cannot even articulate to myself—it had never inspired me to write poetry. There Will Be Blood has.

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JE VOUS SALUE, SARAJEVO BY JEAN-LUC GODARD

By José Sarmiento Hinojosa

Je Vous Salue, Sarajevo is a heartfelt lament on the history of mankind, war, and the art of living. Never had Godard been so poetic; never had his poetry been so tragic, as if sadness permeated everything about what’s human. It is about Sarajevo, the Bosnian war, the Srebrenica massacre, at the time. But it is about war, about the true nature of mankind. A tragic truth that is present among us.

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MALCOLM LE GRICE’S ‘BERLIN HORSE’

By Catherine Jessica Beed

Malcolm Le Grice’s canonical 1970 avant-garde film Berlin Horse was his first full-length experiment with manipulation of the image. The film is essentially combined in two parts. The first, a small sequence of footage of running horses, intially shot in 8mm colour, later refilmed in 16mm black and white, and the second part, segments from an early film The Burning Stable (1896). Both sections were treated by Le Grice with the same process. His black and white footage was subjected to multiple superimposition using colour filters, creating a fluid ever-changing solarized image. He describes the effect of this process as ‘[working] in its own time abstractly from the image’.

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